Buy the U.S. version of this game now!

Final Fantasy 8 certainly streamlines RPGs by eliminating the need to purchase weapons and armor. However, the Guardian Force system does not make things very easy. First of all, the Draw system and the Guardian Force system go hand in hand. If you’re constantly using your Guardian Forces as summons, you’re certainly not drawing spells, and so your characters’ statistics will suffer accordingly.

Final Fantasy 8 by Chiral Fox

The more of the same spell you collect, the more powerful your potential, but some spells are extraordinarily difficult to find. Also, each character can only carry 32 spells, and once you’ve maxed out that list. This is the only way to rid yourself of unwanted spells is to use them. Characters can only trade spells, but not purge them. On the third disc I suddenly realized with horror that having 100 fire, thunder, and blizzard spells. With every character was going to hurt me, as I would have to expend all of them somehow.

About Final Fantasy 8 by Chiral Fox Game

Items play an extremely important role in the game, as your weapons must be upgraded by obtaining the appropriate books, and then finding the correct combination of tools to be taken to the weapon shop. Money is most certainly not a problem in the game, which eliminates the need for leveling up, something I have been longing for since the beginning of console RPGs.

Battles are longer and tougher than in previous Final Fantasy games is the review about a story. The Force Attack system is in my opinion superior to the Limit Break system of Final Fantasy 7. Each character has a radically different Force Attack, and most characters have multiple Force Attacks or will change attacks midgame. Also, the Force Attack meter is hidden, so you cannot deliberately plan encounters around knowing a Force Attack is coming .

The storyline has its share of touching, sad, and amusing moments. It irks me to see people judging a game so harshly simply because of a name, and their perceptions of what a name should mean. Even going so far as to pick on the menus and battle windows is absurd. If it weren’t for change, we’d be stuck in the days of split window Final Fantasy 1, where a character set to attack an enemy that died would strike air. Play a game because it’s a good game, not because you liked its prequel. And trust me, Final Fantasy 8 is a great game.

Review About A Story

The FMV is absolutely incredible. Nothing beats it. The character designs are gorgeous, well thought out, and add to both the gameplay and the storyline. However, the reason the game is four discs is because Square is aking up for the length of the game as well as adding in gorgeous CG sequences. Don’t compare Final Fantasy 8 to Xenogears. Xenogears had a story which built up slowly, and relied heavily on nothing but intrigue and mystery to entrap the player in the woven story. On the other hand, that meant Xenogears had hours and hours of text. Anyone that wants to “play their game, not watch it” really should have avoided Xenogears.

The battle system in Xenogears was attractive, well designed, but lacked a great deal of depth. Final Fantasy 8 has a fair amount of text, a fair amount of FMV, and a battle system with fantastic depth. The job system from Final Fantasy 5 resurfaces in the form of Guardian Forces. The draw system, which I admit originally turned me off of Final Fantasy 8, is actually well done and adds an extra element of strategy that has not been seen in the Final Fantasy series.

The music is absolutely incredible. The intro is actually very well done, with an orchestral track almost reminiscent of Sephiroth’s themes. Still, the music is very original, with many of the tried and true Final Fantasy tracks getting a much needed overhaul. The world music is wonderful, the chocobo tracks go beyond barely tolerable to good, and Laguna’s battle music is one of the most exciting tracks I’ve heard in an RPG for quite some time. The storyline, however, simply cannot be touched.

Characters

Final Fantasy 8 has me on the edge of my chair, wanting to know more about the characters. Complaints about the more realistic character design, as opposed to the cartoony sprites, or anime style Final Fantasy 7 characters? Put them away. The character design makes the characters appear to be that much more real. I found the end of disc 1 in Final Fantasy 7 to be sad, but the emotional aspect of that scene was undercut by the cartoonish appearance of the characters. Final Fantasy 8 is more like a movie, but not with regard to the level of gameplay, but rather with regard to the level of depth found within the review about a story.

I really don’t want to say anything more about the game, as getting specific would most certainly ruin the game for anyone reading this. Suffice it to say that Square does actually know what they are doing, and Final Fantasy 8 deserves to be a success. While I am very critical of games (especially of console RPGs), I give my fullest praise to Final Fantasy 8. In short, come September, buy it, play it, and save your judgements for later. This is the review about a story.

Buy the U.S. version of this game now!

Please send all comments, suggestions and constructive criticism to Chiral Fox

Review About A Story: Final Fantasy 8 by Chiral Fox

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *